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comprehensive tax reform. bill clinton and republican congress with welfare reform and balanced in the budget. so we look forward to making this divided government productive for the american people and the several wellness we have a lot of challenges here at the end of the year. i'll be meeting with the president and the other leadership on friday to talk about the way forward and we look forward to being a part of the solution to the significant problems. it is my pleasure now to turn to our newly elected with come as senator cornyn of texas. >> well, things, natch. it's an honor to be elected by my colleagues to serve as the whip, the assistant leader on the republican side. as a drama, fat, we have a lot of very difficult work to do, but we are committed to working with our colleagues across the aisle to solving the nation's urgent problems. we know what those are in a lame duck coming out this if this are going forward. there is no mystery about that commanders say mr. to solutions based on the president's own bipartisan fiscal commission and others that have laid out the roadmap and hav
the rates. think about it. we haven't touched it since ronald reagan really. in 1986. bill clinton did raise the rate one point but we haven't done anything to touch our rate and reform our code. every other country, all of them have. taxes gone from 16% to 15%. you do business there. this flow of capital will follow countries that have more competitive environment and taxes are one of them. yes, we have to reform the tax code. when you do that, i will get more revenue. it is guaranteed. again, sort of as i was talking about earlier. this is opportunities here. this is opportunity for us as a country. if you look at the congressional budget analysis and joint tax committee analysis, what tax reform could mean in terms of macroeconomic impact and growth, all will lead to more growth, whether corporate tax reform or individual tax reform. >> right but if the president insists as he did last friday, this was fought over in the campaign and, fought over tax rates, rising tax rates, he didn't ice the words rates himself but jay carney, the white house press secretary said the president will veto
the republicans don't agree to raise the top back to where they were when bill clinton left office going over the fiscal cliff? >> i don't see a realistic way to solve this without a recognition. let's see the positive side. it's encouraging use in the leadership recognize we are going to have to generate and that's a good recognition, but you know, we're just at the beginning. we will see how that goes. i agree this is going to be tough. i know the lack of clarity on the resolution is going to be a burden and cause some uncertainty but we have to go through because we are going to govern this country better if we are going to find a better way to make sure we are supporting things that will improve the long-term growth in the country we have to figure out a way to resolve the current divide on these basic questions about the long-term. i think that is worth trying to do. >> well, as you have said and the president said we have to both raise taxes and restrain spending. the president's proposal so far on medicare has been largely limited to the provider side. is the president going to leave h
just -- what did bight say? -- bill clinton say? >> i liked it because he was on a partisan basis, pointing out what added up and what did not, but they were all chaptering for arrhythmia tick. both sides have to realize it has to add up, and it's not just sound bites on tv. the last thing i say that gives me hope, i marched through the bills, they were real bills that were passed, real sized, complicated bills, 52-75 votes in the u.s. senate. we beat the filibuster and got it done. that should be hope that a debt deal is possible in the senate and on some of the bills, majority of them, after we got them down, there was pressure on the house to get it.pro. there's a group of us supportive of the debt commission report, don't agree with everything in it, but continue to push and meet, and it's somewhere between depending on the day, 40-55 senators or so that's meeting off and on for the lastñ&r yearo push it through. there's a devotion to getting it done in the senate. >> you have senior republicansñr like paul ryan saying it's not their intention to raise tax rates. they don't
bill clinton expired. that meant that the so-called paygo rules on the finance tax cuts you couldn't expand new government programs unless you paid for, discretionary spending caps on the fed and other discretionary spending as fired and washington's fund totally out of control. three things happened in 2003. the second round of tax cuts we couldn't afford and we ought to return the deficits we invaded a sovereign nation without declaring war and without paying for it, and we expanded medicare to add prescription drugs added $8 trillion in the from the publications for medicare and was already a minn the underfunded. irresponsible, and things have gotten frankly worse since. >> host: mike is on the line from central massachusetts. mike is a democrat. good morning to you. >> caller: hello. i'm wondering why since our health care system is one of the biggest drivers in the national debt i'm wondering why we never hear the numbers comparing the single-payer system to the private health care system that we have in place now. or the politics to much in the way? i will hang up and wait f
clearly, every single republican economist said bill clinton's tax increase was going to cause a massive recession to every single one. just like every single republican pollster said that romney was going to win. they were 100% wrong, and we had a broom instead. so they have zero credibility. they are wrong about everything and they lie about everything. >> do you feel better? >> yes. [laughter] >> jamie, did you of anything else? okay. stephanie, you indicated that you have a formal think you would like to discuss, or you have some opening remarks and we will give you even though we are already open, so would you, please. you can get appear if you like, absolutely. >> i have a slight chill. -- slideshow. i thought everyone would have one. so, i guess when i started thinking about fiscal cliff and what the options are, i came up with essentially three. one is to do nothing. and hit the cliff and let the cuts go into place and tax increases going to place, what we've been talking about here. the other is to act with a sense of urgency, to avoid the cliff, strike some sort of a grand barg
that washington isn't about politics. spent if you just listen -- >> what did bill clinton say? >> arithmetic. i like that moment for two reason. he was on a partisan pace and he was pointing out what numbers added up and wanted me but i also like the democrats were all chanting for arithmetic because i think both sides are going to have to realize that this has to add up and it can't just the sound bites on tv. the last thing i was to give me hope, i marched to all those bills. those are real bills that got passed, midsize, confidence. it was only 62-75 votes in the u.s. senate. we beat the filibuster and guided them. so that should give you hope that it didn't do is possible in the senate, and on some of those bills the majority of them, after we got down there was pressure on the house to get it done. there's a group of us have been supportive of the debt commission report, the general framework agreement agree with everything anybody has continued to push and meet. it somewhere between, depending on the day, 40-55 senators are so that's been meeting off and on for the last year to try to pus
obama's, as did bill clinton, with a republican-controlled house and a republican-controlled senate after a more resounding second-term victory than president obama. both examples -- both of them -- illustrate the rare opportunity that divided government presents. president obama can follow suit or he can take the extremist view that both reagan and clinton rejected, by thumbing his nose at the other side and insisting that if republicans aren't willing to do things his way, he won't do anything at all. now, if the president's serious, he'll follow the leads of president reagan and clinton. if he's really serious, he'll put the campaign rhetoric aside, propose a realistic solution that can pass a republican-controlled house and a divided senate, and work to get it done. and if the president acts in this spirit, i have no doubt he'll have the support of his own party and a willing partner in ours. and the american people will breathe a sigh of relief knowing not only that we've avoided a crisis but that washington can still serve their interests. unless we act i, in a few short weeks
, immigration and other things? >> just as with bill clinton, got us to raise taxes, i don't think the tax increases we did under clinton as i recall talking about $36, the notion there were people out there having marginal rates going up by 36,000 are going to say oh well, this is not worth it. i don't think the tax increases we voted under clinton caused the great economic boom but they did not correct it. and in favor of raising taxes, despite the fact he was raising taxes, the development is republican efforts to beat him over the head, it helped him some, but the fact that it was neutral and beyond that, what that stands for was relevant, mandate against severe cuts in domestic spending against severe cuts in medicare. the republicans on the one hand, a major argument about medicare, cut $700 billion you shouldn't have done that so there is a mandate for avoiding the kind of cuts to domestic programs that were important out of this election. mitt romney did as a favor of advocating for significantly increased military spending. first-time candidate for president said we don't need tha
and do something good, something really good for the country. ronald reagan understood this. bill clinton understood this. and president obama seemed to understand it too in december of 2010. so i'll say it again. the only way we succeed is if the president steps up and leaders. it starts by showing that he's serious about success. and let's be clear, an opening bid of $1.6 trillion in new taxes just isn't serious. it's more than simpson-bowles or any other bipartisan commission has called for. it's been unanimously rejected in the house and senate. it's twice as much as the white house seemed ready to agree to during last summer's debt ceiling talks. and looked at in the context of the spending cuts yet to be enacted from the president's other proposals, it amounts to about 20 cents in cuts for every new dollar in tax hikes. in other words, no cuts at all. it's a joke. a joke. look, people i talk to across kentucky, they don't want any more political fights. th*e'd like to -- they'd like to see us get somewhere. they want the two parties to work together to find a solution to our fiscal
then-president bill clinton. conservative republicans joined with a democratic president to help millions of lower-income people break free of the cycle of dependency and despair. of course, we know we've had divided government. as i said earlier, we really had a status quo election in that sense. we've had divided government since january 2011 when republicans regained the majority in the house of representatives. the result over the last two years, sadly, it has produced legislative stalemates and bitter recriminations. why should anybody expect that things will be different going forward? i think, mr. president, what's different now from then is that republicans and democrats alike recognize we are at a crossroads, that our current fiscal path is unsustainable, and that we're either going to send the economy back into a recession -- unless we deal with the fiscal cliff and the sequester -- or the alternative is -- and being an optimist by nature, i think we have an opportunity to address some of our nation's most challenging fiscal issues. but the fact of the matter is this: y
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11